Plymouth MA Real Estate | Sharren Marquis - Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage - Plymouth


Selling a house may prove to be difficult, particularly for those who are competing against dozens of rival sellers in the same city or town. Fortunately, there are lots of things that you can do to gain a competitive advantage over rivals in a fierce housing market.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you get a leg up on the home selling competition.

1. Focus on Curb Appeal

How your residence looks to buyers can have far-flung effects on the house selling journey. Thus, if you allocate time and resources to upgrade your house's curb appeal, you can differentiate your home from all others in your area. And as a result, you could speed up the home selling cycle.

To enhance your home's curb appeal, eliminate clutter and debris in front of your residence. Also, if there is any damaged home siding, you should fix this problem.

If you are unsure about how to improve your home's curb appeal on your own, you can always hire professionals to help you out, too. These professionals will take the guesswork out of home exterior improvements and allow you to upgrade your residence's curb appeal without delay.

2. Set an Aggressive Initial Asking Price

If you price your home too high, you risk alienating prospective buyers. Or, if you price your house too low, you risk missing out on the chance to optimize your home sale earnings.

Ultimately, it is beneficial to establish an aggressive initial home asking price. If you learn about the local housing market, you can compare your residence to available houses in your city or town. Then, you can use this housing market data to help you establish a competitive initial asking price for your home.

You may want to conduct a home appraisal as well. That way, you can receive a property valuation that you can use to help you set an aggressive initial home asking price.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

Navigating a fierce housing market often is challenging for first-time and experienced house sellers alike. Lucky for you, real estate agents are available who can help you simplify the house selling journey.

By hiring a real estate agent, you can collaborate with a home selling expert. Typically, a real estate agent will work with you to create a custom home selling strategy. And when you are prepared to sell your home, a real estate agent will ensure that you can put this plan into effect and achieve the best-possible results.

Furthermore, a real estate agent will help you review any offers to purchase your house. He or she is happy to provide honest, unbiased home selling recommendations. By doing so, a real estate agent will help you immediately sell your residence and get the best price for your home.

Ready to sell your house? Take advantage of the aforementioned tips, and you can quickly and effortlessly sell your home in a competitive real estate market.


Photo by Karsten Bergmann via Pixabay

Take a tour through the United Kingdom, Germany, Belgium or Holland, and you’ll see beautiful historic homes with painted brick exteriors. Wander down streets of hundreds-of-years-old houses, and the most memorable ones are those with painted brick exteriors. But if your brick is in perfect condition, why would you paint it?

Odd-Colored Brick

Some eras produced color variations in brick that detract from the architectural details of a building. When overly pale or harsh bricks detract from a beautiful porch, craftsman detailing or outstanding woodwork, painting your brick can give your home instant curb appeal and new life. Paint your brick with a quality masonry paint for lasting European elegance. Spraying gives the most even coverage to brick surfaces.

Highly-Textured Brick

The 70s gave us bell-bottoms, embroidered shirts and ugly brick. Adding texture to bricks, while popular at that time, gave some home exteriors the appearance of crawling worms and others a rough and stark industrial uniformity. If either of these is the case with your home, you can smooth out some of the texture by using elastomeric masonry paint. Up to ten times the thickness of regular exterior paints, this watertight substance fills in cracks and smooths out some of the roughness of excessive texture. That being said, for best results and to avoid lumps and bubbles, hire a professional painting contractor with experience applying elastomeric paints.

Uneven or Colored Mortar

Another reason to paint is when the mortar used on your brick home is distractingly uneven. To smooth out some of the unevenness and give your home Old World charm, consider the German Schmear method. Also referred to as German “smear,” this method mimics the centuries-old plaster and white-wash techniques of yesteryear. To achieve the look, wet mortar is smeared or scraped over the existing brick and mortar. You can cover all the brick and mortar, or just portions of it for a historic exposed brick and limewash look. However, a similar effect is achievable using a prepared limewash specifically developed for exterior applications from your home improvement or professional paint store.

Before You Paint Your Brick

Proper preparation is necessary to achieve superior results. Follow this all-important list or you may end up redoing the outside of your home sooner than you expect.

  • Wash the brick. Use a stiff-bristled brush or pressure washer (set on low) to remove any dirt or grime buildup on the brick.
  • Scrape off any moss or mold and treat the brick with undiluted distilled white vinegar or a mold removal preparation available from your DIY retailer.
  • Repair any deep cracks, broken or chipped mortar or missing bricks.

Your paint store can advise you on what works best in your situation and your climate. Painting your home’s brick gives it appeal to a whole different segment of homebuyers, so talk to your real estate professional about plans to paint it before putting your house on the market.


This Single-Family in Plymouth, MA recently sold for $370,000. This Gambrel style home was sold by Shari Marquis - Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage - Plymouth.


51 White Oak Dr, Plymouth, MA 02360

Single-Family

$375,000
Price
$370,000
Sale Price

8
Rooms
3
Beds
1/1
Full/Half Baths
This Gambrel Colonial with a two-car attached garage is located on a side street near golf courses and schools, just a short distance to Route 3. Many recent updates including the furnace (five years) hot water heater in 2019, the roof (seven years old). Features include hardwood flooring throughout, a fireplaced living room, formal dining room, eat-in kitchen, a family room with a propane stove, French doors leading to the screened porch, a deck and a private backyard. Stay warm in the winter with the generator and there's parking for up to ten vehicles.

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Shopping for a home is an exciting time for any hopeful homeowner. After weeks of scouring listings looking for the perfect home in the ideal location for you and your family, it can seem like you’ve found the needle in the haystack.

When it’s time to go visit that home, it’s easy to put on rose-colored lenses and overlook issues that should, at the very least, be taken into consideration when it comes to deciding whether or not you should make a bid on the home and how much you should offer.

Today’s post is all about preparing you for that first viewing. We’ll give you tips on what to look out for and how to factor these things into your equation when it comes to making an offer.

Check the listing for omissions

Even if a home looks perfect on paper (or on its website listing), it’s still quite likely that there are things you’ll want to know about before considering an offer. A home listing should attempt to address several questions you might have. But ultimately, it’s main goal is to attract interest in the home.

So, what type of things should be in the listing that the seller might leave out?

  • Poor street conditions, heavy traffic, and blind driveways are all things that will factor into your decision but most likely won’t be mentioned in a listing

  • Odors of any kind can be off-putting and difficult to remove. Some homeowners may not even know that their home has an offensive odor if they’ve become used to it.

  • Room omissions. If the home is listed as having two bathrooms but there are only photos of one, this could be a sign that there are problems with the second bathroom that the seller doesn’t want you to see quite yet.

Top dollar home repairs

A professional home inspection will be able to give you an idea of the kind of money you’ll need to spend on renovations in the coming years. But why wait? When touring a home, ask questions about the last time important renovations and repairs were made.

Roofs, septic systems, and electrical work are just a few of the things that are expensive to repair or replace. If the previous homeowner has a small family or lives alone and you plan on moving in with a houseful of kids, you might find that your impact on the septic and electrical systems of the home are too much for the house to handle. You’ll want to take this into account before considering a bid on the home.

Utility costs

The cost of heating a home in the winter and keeping it cool in the summer can be hefty if the home isn’t properly sealed and weatherproofed. Ask the current homeowner what they spend per month on utilities to get an idea of what you might be spending.

Then, take a look at the windows and doors. Cracks, malfunctioning locks, and worn weatherstripping are all signs that the home will need some work to be energy-efficient.

Don’t ignore the little things

Small fixes may not seem like a big deal when viewing a home. They can even deceive you into thinking that you’re getting a good deal by buying a fixer-upper for a price that’s lower than the market average.

However, it’s important to keep in mind that small fixes around the house are a sign that bigger problems are also being neglected. Don’t be too quick to assume the house will be a good deal before getting it professionally inspected.


Photo by 영훈 박 via Pixabay


Your bathroom can be a considerable source of energy use in your home. The Department of Energy states that water heating accounts for up to 18 percent of energy bills, which is the second largest expense in your home after heating and cooling. Showers and baths aren’t the only reasons for high energy use in bathrooms, though. Lighting and exhaust fans also add to this amount. The good news is that you can make your bathrooms more energy-efficient with the following tips. 

Limit Hot Water Use

Since water heating uses up so much energy, finding ways to use less hot water can add up to significant energy savings. You can do this by taking showers instead of baths, which use up more hot water. Taking shorter showers, such as limiting them to about 10 minutes or less, also helps reduce the amount of hot water you’re using on a daily basis. Installing a low-flow shower head and using cooler rather than hotter water can help you save even more energy.

Use Your Exhaust Fans Efficiently

Bathrooms have exhaust fans to help reduce the risk of mold and mildew growth from moisture. While it’s important to run these when you shower or bathe, keep in mind that they use up energy while they’re on. You can lower this energy usage by only keeping exhaust fans on for about 15 minutes after getting out of the shower. Switching to a more energy-efficient exhaust fan can also help you use less energy while still keeping your bathroom safe from mold and mildew. 

Consider Your Bathroom Lighting

The lights in your bathroom can use up more energy if you’re using incandescent bulbs, especially if you have several vanity lights around or over your sink and mirror. Switching to compact fluorescent bulbs (CFLs) or LED bulbs cuts down on your energy usage when your bathroom lights are on. These bulbs also typically last longer than incandescent bulbs and produce less heat, making them safer and more cost-effective. Installing motion sensors for your bathroom lights can also save energy by ensuring that they’re not accidentally left on for long periods of time. 

Unplug Curling Irons and Hair Dryers

Leaving curling irons and hair dryers plugged in when they’re not being used might not seem like a big source of energy use. However, these devices keep drawing small amounts of electricity the entire time they’re plugged in, even if they’re not turned on. You can save on your bathroom energy usage on a regular basis by getting into the habit of unplugging these devices when you’re not using them. 

If you plan on selling your home or purchasing a new home, please contact us.




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